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Is Ubuntu bashing now an acceptable standard for Linux?

One of Linux’s finest virtues is freedom.  Freedom to do what you want with a piece of code so long as you make your new code available to anyone who uses it.  Sounds fair doesn’t it? So why is it then that when Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, try to do something different they get hammered for it?


I was reading a blog post last week (sorry I have lost the link) about Ubuntu’s choice to include Mir probably in 14.04 LTS. The author really didn’t like this at all and throughout the blog was making references to Mark Shuttleworths ego, how Ubuntu wasn’t listening to its users and how Linux was a democracy and that the people hadn’t voted for this.  Now since when is Linux a democracy? Linus Torvalds has the final say on what goes into the Linux kernel.  There isn’t a vote to see what everyone wants and to be honest I am thankful for that as you can have too many chiefs making the decisions at the top.

Canonical is a business and businesses have to make money inorder for them to survive.  This is why I can understand the Amazon connection when you search for something in Dash.  I may not like it but I can understand it.  Their push into the tablet territory is also understandable as this is where the market is going if people want to believe it or not.  There is one BIG BUT in all of this and that is I can choose not to use Ubuntu if I don’t like the direction Canonical are taking it.  There are literally hundreds of distributions to choose from so if you don’t like the direction one is heading then you just choose another.  It is that simple.  There is no need to constantly bash Canonical (and by default Ubuntu) because you don’t like what it is doing.

Personally I choose Debian for my servers and Mint for my desktops.  I have tried Ubuntu a couple of times and personally find it less stable than Debian and less attractive than Mint. But guess what I didn’t cry foul from the rooftops just because I didnt like it.  I just chose something else and that is what a lot of people are needing to do.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in Stirling and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

I am having a love affair – with Linux!!


My wife has finally found out what she has always thought – I am in love with Linux.  I honestly can’t help it (before someone asks no I don’t have a thing for penguins!!).  My main distributions of choice and Debian and Linux Mint and I love how stable both are. They both don’t (usually) break when I update them and in the case of Linux Mint things just work straight out of the box. Debian is a bit harder to setup but it makes a bloody good server platform.  I currently have two Debian and one Ubuntu server installed “out in the wild” and have had little problems with them over the last 12 months.

In my line of work one of the perks is trying out new and different pieces of software and hardware.  I get to see what works for me and what doesn’t (everyone will have their own way of doing things).  I have come to rely on Linux Live CD’s to recover data off Windows installations which will no longer boot up, running virus scans with Antivirus Live CD’s (BitDefender anyone?),using a netbook running Xubuntu 12.04 which I use to configure routers along with an Android tablet (based on Linux) which monitors my servers and which I also use to carry out wifi audits.  This is coupled with my own Debian 7 server running Oracle Virtualbox which allows me to try out different versions of both Linux and Windows operating systems.

But you see I have a problem which I have only just come to recognise.  The IT world is not just Linux based but also incorporates (to a very large extent) Windows.  Most of the clients I meet will be running Windows in some form, maybe just desktops and maybe for servers too and I need to keep my eye on the ball with regards to what is best for my clients and not necessarily best for me.  This is one of the reasons my next server install will probably be Windows Server 2012 Essentials as I have done loads of testing in a virtual environment but nothing as yet “in the wild”.

I have seen too many tech people (and good one’s too) go down the route of “I am Windows based”, or  “I am Linux based” or even “I just work on Mac’s”.  I would rather have a well rounded experience of both Windows and Linux systems so I could then judge what would work best for my clients in a particular situation.

I may end up working more on Windows systems but my toolkit will always contain Linux.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in Stirling, Falkirk and Perth.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

How to share files on Debian Wheezy


I love Debian.  It is very stable and works great as a server, especially a file server, so today I will show you how to share files on Debian Wheezy.

Before we do anything you first have to set a static ip address on your server and this tutorial will show you how. Now we need to install some packages. The first one is samba so open up your terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install samba

Next we need the cifs-utils package so again in your terminal type:

sudo apt-get install cifs-utils

Now we need to configure samba and for that we need the smb.conf file.  In your terminal type:

sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

I am using nano but you can use any text editor you choose.

Locate the line workgroup=WORKGROUP and modify it to use the name of your network. For example mine would be:

workgroup=Home_Network01

Now we need to add the network share so scroll down to the bottom of the file and add the following text:

[Shared_Files] – This is the name of your network share

path = home/chris/Shared_Files (change this to the location of your network share)

available = yes

browsable = yes

public = yes

writable = yes

comment =shared files

Now save the file and exit.

We now need to add users to the smbpasswd file.  Only users specified in this file will be allowed to access your samba shares. In your terminal type:

sudo smbpasswd -a user (where user is the person allowed to access the shares)

Where prompted enter a password for them twice.  Please note that for a user to be entered into the smbpasswd file they have to have user accounts on the server itself.

Once that is done we need to restart the samba service so again in your terminal type:

sudo service samba restart

As a final check type:

testparm

If there are any configuration errors then testparm will show them to you. If everything is configured correctly you can check the status of your shares by typing:

smbclient -L 10.0.0.1 (where 10.0.0.1 is the ip address of your file server)

All you have to do now is map the drive to your Linux or Windows clients to get access to your files.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

How to set up a DNS server on Debian Wheezy


Debian makes a fantastic server.  It is stable and very rarely goes down so today I will show you how to turn it into a DNS server.  For this tutorial I will be using Debian Wheezy as my base system.

On your server open up a terminal and  install the bind9 package by typing:

sudo apt-get install bind9

There are four configuration files we will need to configure so lets take the first.  In your terminal type:

sudo nano /etc/bind/named.conf.local

and replace nano with your favourite text editor.

Within the file insert the following code:

————————————————————————————————————————

# This is the zone definition. replace example.com with your domain name
zone “comtech.com” {
type master;
file “/etc/bind/zones/comtech.com.db”;
};

# This is the zone definition for reverse DNS. replace 0.0.10 with your network address in reverse notation – e.g my network address is 0.0.10
zone “0.0.10.in-addr.arpa” {
type master;
file “/etc/bind/zones/rev.0.0.10.in-addr.arpa”;
};

———————————————————————————————————————

Instead if using comtech.com choose your own DNS domain (this is not the same as an active directory domain but rather a name for your DNS zone).

WORD OF WARNING

Make sure the ” marks above are vertical and not curved.  If they are curved you will get errors when you come to restart the bind 9 package (trust me I have done that a couple of times!!)

Now we need to configure the next file.  In your terminal type:

sudo nano /etc/bind/named.conf.options

You will need to adjust the forwarders with the address of your ISP’s DNS servers (the example below shows BT’s DNS servers). Modify the file accordingly.

———————————————————————————————————————

forwarders {

62.6.40.178;
62.6.40.162;
};

———————————————————————————————————————

Next up is the zones file so in your terminal type:

sudo mkdir /etc/bind/zones

Now we need to configure it by typing:

sudo nano /etc/bind/zones/comtech.com.db (replace comtech.com with your DNS domain).

Add the following code to the file:

————————————————————————————————————————

// replace example.com with your domain name. do not forget the . after the domain name!
// Also, replace ns1 with the name of your DNS server
comtech.com. IN SOA HomeServer01.comtech.com.
// Do not modify the following lines!
2006081401
28800
3600
604800
38400

)

// Replace the following line as necessary:
// ns1 = DNS Server name
// mta = mail server name
// example.com = domain name
comtech.com. IN NS HomeServer01.comtech.com.
comtech.com. IN MX 10 mta.example.com.

// Replace the IP address with the right IP addresses.
www IN A 10.0.0.1
mta IN A 10.0.0.3
HomeServer01 IN A 10.0.0.1

———————————————————————————————————————

In the above code replace the following:

comtech.com with your DNS domain name,

10.0.0.1 with your static DNS server address,

HomeServer01.comtech.com with your computers hostname.dns-domain,

mta is your mail server (if you have one). If you do modify the IP address to show this.

Now we have to create the reverse DNS zone file so in your terminal type:

sudo nano /etc/bind/zones/rev.0.0.10.in-addr.arpa

and add the following code:

———————————————————————————————————————

//replace example.com with your domain name, ns1 with your DNS server name.
// The number before IN PTR example.com is the machine address of the DNS server
@ IN SOA HomeServer01.comtech.com admin.comtech.com. (
2006081401;
28800;
604800;
604800;
86400
)

IN NS HomeServer01.comtech.com.
1 IN PTR comtech.com

————————————————————————————————————————

With all the files configured we just have to restart bind so in your terminal type:

sudo service bind9 restart

Don’t forget to test your new configuration:

dig comtech.com

If you are unable to restart the bind9 service run the command named -g 53 which will give you a list of any configuration errors as this is usually the case.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

Is it time to streamline Linux?


I love Linux.  It is cracking as a server and not bad on a desktop either but it always comes down to the same old question – which one to use?  I got talking to another tech last week about this.  We started talking about which distros were good as servers (my vote was for Debian by the way!!) and then he said “It would be much better if there weren’t so many distros to choose from”.  I hate to say it but I think he may have a point.

If you look at Distrowatch there are currently 319 linux distributions listed.  Of these over 70 are Ubuntu based (please correct me if I am wrong).  There is also currently about 29 desktop environments.  How much choice do we need?  At this point people will turn around and say that choice is good and that if you don’t find what you are looking for in one distribution then try another one.  I would agree to a point but it does feel like people are reinventing the wheel to some extent.  For example how many distros do we need based on Ubuntu?

I am asked a lot by both clients and friends which distro would I recommend? Usually Linux Mint / Ubuntu for desktop and Debian as a server but then they talk to someone else and they may get Fedora on a desktop and CentOS on a server.  You can see where I am taking this.  You ask a different person for their opinion and you will get a different distro every time.

It can also be a nightmare from a techs point of view too.  When starting out in Linux it is always best to get a grasp of the universal basics (command line etc) but at some point you will want to go distro specific.  Which one? I have stuck with the deb based distros as this is what I have the most experience with.  If I came across an rpm distro in “the wild” I would not feel as confident in fixing any issues it might have.  If you take Windows as an example a tech could learn Windows 7 and still have a good crack at Windows 8.  This is not usually the case with Linux.

Also look at the resources that are currently being wasted.  If you take all the developers that are currently dispersed across 319 distros and combined them into say 5 it would make a huge difference in the way linux is perceived.  With less distros to support hardware manufacturers would start to pay more attention (more drivers available) and so would the general public.  A streamlined Linux would become a much effective force to do battle with the likes of Microsoft and would certainly start to gain market share.

So what do you think? Would a streamlined Linux work?

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

How to start programs at login in Debian LXDE

Today I will show you how to start programs at login in Debian LXDE.  Even though I am using Debian LXDE these steps will work on any distribution using LXDE.

LXDE uses the ./config/autostart file to load programs at startup so this is the file we will be configuring but first we have to get the exact name of the program we want to run.  Open up a terminal and type:

cd /usr/share/applications 

followed by

ls

You should get a list similar to the one below.

——————————————————————————————————————————–

alacarte.desktop
at-properties.desktop
baobab.desktop
bluetooth-properties.desktop
bme.desktop
brasero-copy-medium.desktop
brasero.desktop
brasero-nautilus.desktop
cheese.desktop
dasher.desktop
default-applications.desktop
defaults.list
display-properties.desktop
dropbox.desktop
ekiga.desktop
empathy-accounts.desktop
empathy.desktop
eog.desktop
epiphany.desktop
evince.desktop
evolution.desktop
evolution-mail.desktop
evolution-settings.desktop
file-roller.desktop
freecell.desktop
gcalctool.desktop
gconf-editor.desktop
gdebi.desktop
gedit.desktop
gimp.desktop
gksu.desktop
glchess.desktop
glines.desktop
gmenu-simple-editor.desktop
gnash.desktop
gnect.desktop
gnibbles.desktop
gnobots2.desktop
gnome-about.desktop
gnome-about-me.desktop
gnome-appearance-properties.desktop
gnomecc.desktop
gnome-dictionary.desktop
gnome-font-viewer.desktop
gnome-nettool.desktop
gnome-network-properties.desktop
gnome-panel.desktop
gnome-power-preferences.desktop
gnome-power-statistics.desktop
gnome-screensaver-preferences.desktop
gnome-screenshot.desktop
gnome-search-tool.desktop
gnome-settings-mouse.desktop
gnome-sound-recorder.desktop
gnome-sudoku.desktop
gnome-system-log.desktop
gnome-system-monitor.desktop
gnome-terminal.desktop
gnome-theme-installer.desktop
gnome-user-share-properties.desktop
gnome-volume-control.desktop
gnome-wm.desktop
gnomine.desktop
gnotravex.desktop
gnotski.desktop
gok.desktop
google-chrome.desktop
gparted.desktop
gpicview.desktop
grsync.desktop
gstreamer-properties.desktop
gtali.desktop
gucharmap.desktop
hamster-standalone.desktop
hplj1020.desktop
iagno.desktop
iceweasel.desktop
inkscape.desktop
keybinding.desktop
keyboard.desktop
leafpad.desktop
libfm-pref-apps.desktop
liferea.desktop
lxappearance.desktop
lxde-logout.desktop
lxde-screenlock.desktop
lxde-x-terminal-emulator.desktop
lxde-x-www-browser.desktop
lxinput.desktop
lxmusic.desktop
lxrandr.desktop
lxsession-edit.desktop
lxterminal.desktop
mahjongg.desktop
manage-print-jobs.desktop
metacity.desktop
mimeinfo.cache
nautilus-autorun-software.desktop
nautilus-browser.desktop
nautilus-computer.desktop
nautilus.desktop
nautilus-file-management-properties.desktop
nautilus-folder-handler.desktop
nautilus-home.desktop
network.desktop
network-scheme.desktop
nm-connection-editor.desktop
notification-properties.desktop
obconf.desktop
openbox.desktop
openjdk-6-java.desktop
openjdk-6-javaws.desktop
openjdk-6-policytool.desktop
openoffice.org-base.desktop
openoffice.org-calc.desktop
openoffice.org-draw.desktop
openoffice.org-impress.desktop
openoffice.org-math.desktop
openoffice.org-startcenter.desktop
openoffice.org-writer.desktop
orca.desktop
palimpsest.desktop
pcmanfm.desktop
python2.6.desktop
qt4config.desktop
quadrapassel.desktop
remmina.desktop
reportbug.desktop
rhythmbox.desktop
screensavers
seahorse.desktop
seahorse-pgp-encrypted.desktop
seahorse-pgp-keys.desktop
seahorse-pgp-preferences.desktop
seahorse-pgp-signature.desktop
services.desktop
session-properties.desktop
shares.desktop
shotwell.desktop
shotwell-viewer.desktop
simple-scan.desktop
software-properties.desktop
sol.desktop
sound-juicer.desktop
synaptic.desktop
synaptic-kde.desktop
system-config-printer.desktop
teamviewer-teamviewer7.desktop
time.desktop
tomboy.desktop
totem.desktop
transmission.desktop
unbranded-software-center.desktop
update-manager.desktop
users.desktop
vino-preferences.desktop
virtualbox.desktop
window-properties.desktop
xarchiver.desktop
xsane.desktop
xscreensaver-properties.desktop
yelp.desktop

——————————————————————————————————————————–


For the purpose of this tutorial I will configure virtualbox at startup.  Now we have to copy the virtualbox.desktop file into the autostart directory so in your terminal type:

cp /usr/share/applications/virtualbox.desktop /home/chris/.config/autostart

and then restart the system.  Virtualbox should now start at login.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

How to configure file sharing on Debian 6.0

Recently I have changed over my main server to Debian 6.0 running the LXDE desktop.  I have a requirement to share my main files across the network to both Windows and Linux machines and because of this I will be using Samba.

The steps outlined in this tutorial should work if you have a desktop environment installed (in my case LXDE) or not.

First thing we need to do is set a static ip address for our server.  Once we have that setup it is time to download and install the packages we need – smbfs, samba and smbclient.

Open up a terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install samba

Type your root password when prompted.  You will be asked to provide a Workgroup name during installation.

Now install smbfs by typing:

sudo apt-get install smbfs

and then type your root password again.


Finally install smbclient by typing:

sudo apt-get install smbclient

We now have to configure the smb.conf file which contains all the samba settings. In a terminal type:

sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

Locate the line WORKROUP = ********* and check that it is set to the name you entered when installing samba (Mine was set to HomeServer_01).

Now at the end of the file add the following text:

[Shared_Files] (This is the name of your share – change as appropriate)
path = /home/chris (This is the network path to your share – change as appropriate)
available = yes
browsable = yes
public = yes
writable = yes
comment = shared files

Save the file and exit.

Now we have to add users to the smbpasswd file which is located at /etc/samba/smbpasswd. Only users specified in the smbpasswd file will be able to access your samba shares.  Open a terminal and type:

sudo smbpasswd -a user (where user is the name of the person allowed to access the shares)

When prompted enter their new password twice.

We now need to restart the samba service so in a terminal type:

sudo service samba restart

Now we have to check the configuration so far.  In a terminal type:

testparm

Testparm will tell you if there are any errors in your configuration.  If everything is Ok then type:

smbclient -L 10.0.0.1 (where 10.0.0.1 is the ip address of your samba server).

This will show you the list of all your available samba shares.  At this point if you have no errors your server is configured correctly.

Linux Clients

Install samba and smbfs either using the package manager or the command line.  You will need to set the Workgroup parameter in the smb.conf file to the same value as you entered on the server (in my case HomeServer_01).

Then we have to mount the available shares.  First decide where you are going to mount them.  I will mount them in /media/dev/share but first I will have to make the directory dev so:

cd /media

sudo mkdir dev

and then ls which should show us the new dev directory in media.  Now time to mount the shares.

sudo mount -t smbfs //10.0.0.1/(share name) /media/dev/share where 10.0.0.1 is the ip address of your samba server.  This will mount the share but only as long as you are logged in.  To make the link persistent you need to enter the following line into /etc/fstab.

//10.0.0.1/(share)   /media/dev/share      cifs       username=user,password=pass,user,rw,noatime     0              0

Windows Clients

We have to change the workgroup to the same value as the Debian server (Home Server_01 in this case) and then add the ip address of the samba server to the hosts file (must open as administrator).

Once this is complete map the shares to your computer.

Word of warning here about firewalls.  Either turn them off or add exception rules for traffic on ports 137-139 and 445.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

How to replace Lilo with Grub


I have been having some ‘issues’ with Lilo recently on a Debian LXDE system and thought it was about time I replaced it with Grub instead.  This is how you do it.

Open up a terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install grub

Now type:

sudo grub-install /dev/sdb

Replace /dev/sdb with the hard disk you want to install the bootloader on.

We then need to create the file menu.1st which holds all the Grub boot information so type:

sudo update-grub

All that is left to do is uninstall Lilo and we do that by typing:

sudo apt-get remove lilo

Hopefully that will install grub in the MBR.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

 

 

 

 

No init found. Try passing init=bootarg


No init found. Try passing init=bootarg. This error has come up frequently over the last couple of days on my Debian LXDE system. After one too many times I decided to go looking for a solution.  After searching the net I found that the error message is due to errors on the hard disk.  The solution to fix the problem is as follows:

1. Get your hands on a Live CD (I choose Linux Mint 12)

2. Boot your system from the Live CD and fire up GParted (Gparted must be run as root)

3. Highlight your hard drive and click Check Drive.  This will check the filesystem on the hard drive and fix any errors.  Depending on the size of the hard drive this may take some time.

4. Boot up your system as normal.

Hope this helps!!

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

 

The problem with Linux


Before I get blasted for writing this I would like to say that I love Linux.  My business is built on Linux and open source software and it generally fills most if not all my computing requirements.  Then how, I hear you cry, can I write a blog which starts “The Problem with Linux”? Simple, the user experience, and I shall explain more.

This morning I got a message on Facebook from a client I had seen last night.  The issue was that I had installed vlc on a netbook with Linux Mint 11 which did not allow them to record audio from a webcam.  Turns out that vlc and webcams don’t really get on (another thing learnt then!!).  No problem I will just do some research and find a better program but this is where the problem started.  Most of the packages available were from source.  Now I have no problem with downloading and installing from source but your average user will.  Why can’t we have deb and rpm downloads (which most distributions use) so that users can just go and install the package they want.  Yes we have package managers but not all the software your average user wants is already in there.  Yes I can charge money for installing software for my clients but it really isn’t the best is it?

Next thing is choice.  Personally I think there is too much choice.  For example, how many distributions based on Ubuntu or Debian do we really need?  Again your average user just wants a system that works and they definitely don’t want to have to choose packages.  Most people for example will use Microsoft Word for word processing but you give them a Linux system and suddenly they can have Libreoffice, Openoffice, Abiword etc and they become overwhelmed with the amount of choice.  They have come from a Windows system where you are told Windows Media Player does video, Internet Explorer IS the internet etc so they have become molded into this way of thinking.

Next thing is support.  I am a Linux Mint user and I must say that the community forum is brillant.  Having browsed around some of the other forums I can honestly say that there are some people who take the attitude that if you don’t have the same amount of Linux knowledge as them then you must be stupid.  The amount of times I have come across postings from people who think it is ok to post “read the f****** manual” is incredible.  How on earth is this helpful to someone who is making the switch from a Windows system?  All it does is enforce peoples opinion of “us and them” and that is not going to help anyone.

The command line.  Those three words terrify your average user.  The command line is great if you need to work with a server (no gui) but does the average user really need to go anywhere near it to do simple tasks?  I am not saying take it away by any means but lets not forget that although some of us love to tinker and improve our systems by using the command line most users see a computer as a vessel to get things done.  They don’t want to learn how it works they just want to use it.

Why does Linux try and reinvent the wheel?  We have software that does pretty much everything we could ever want so why do we need another KDE or Gnome distribution based on Ubuntu, Debian, Slackware etc?  We now have Openoffice and Libreoffice where surely it would be more beneficial if all the developers got involved in the same project and took on Microsoft Office?

Why do we need new distribution updates every 6 months? If you told your average Windows user they would have to save all their documents and install another operating system every 18 months (usual life span of the major distributions) they would up and leave.  Yes I understand the need to keep packages upto date and have the newest stuff but to me this is just to quick.  For instance the world has had Windows XP for 11 years while Linux Mint 12, which is used to run most of my business, will be gone in about 18 months.

Linux will not become more adopted, outside servers, unless the experience for the average user becomes simpler.  Recent estimates of desktop adoption put Linux at 1.5% well behind both Microsoft and Apple.  To get Linux adopted more we have to start designing for both the average user and the power user.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

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