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Why virtualization is not just for the big guys


If you ever hear the word virtualization mentioned in a conversation I will bet that you will immediately think of big companies with hundreds , if not thousands of computers, and big data centers.  What if I told you your small business (with maybe only 1-10 employees) could also benefit from virtualization and that in fact it could make you run more efficient and not cost you any extra money.  I shall now explain how.

The basis of virtualization is very simple.  It is the ability to run multiple operating systems on the same physical hardware at the same time.  So for example you could run Windows XP and Windows 7 on the same computer or even Windows 7 running on a Linux system.  Now I  hear you cry “Why would I ever want to do such a thing?” Let me give you some examples.

Imagine a business owner who purchases a Mac for his business.  He intends to use it everyday but then releases that he still needs Windows to run some software.  Now by installing a piece of virtualization software from the likes of VMWare, Parallels or Oracle Virtualbox he will be able to run both Max OS X and Windows 7 at the same time on his system and switching between the two when he needs too.  He now has the best of both worlds.

Now take another business that runs a mission critical piece of software on Windows XP. They decide to upgrade all their machines in the office to Windows 7 and then realise that the business critical software only runs on XP.  What happens now? They can install a piece of software from VMWare called VMWare converter and convert their physical system into a virtual one!! Install VMWare onto their new Windows 7 system and then upload the ‘old’ XP system as a virtual machine.

So what are the benefits of virtualization then?

1. You can run any software you want on any system you like.

2. You are able to run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which in turn cuts down on hardware costs and also electricity costs too.

3. Very easy to backup your systems.  If the virtual machine becomes corrupt you just delete it and reload a backup copy.  Very fast and simple to recover your systems.

4. The software is free.  You can use VMWare Player, Oracle Virtualbox, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix Xen Server or KVM.  The choice is yours!!

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

Using Linux in a small business – cheap and chearful IT?


I have had quite a lot of Linux work recently which makes a nice change.  When out at a clients premises earlier this week I got chatting to one of the employees who out of curiosity asked what it was I was actually doing with the server. To this I replied “installing Linux to act as a file server to share and backup all your data”.  The response I got was “hey I thought Linux was dead – proper old school only for businesses or people who don’t have a lot of money”

I had the same response when talking to another “techie” person this week.  He described it as “cheap and chearful IT” and “businesses only like it because it is cheap”.  As you can imagine I totally disagreed with this.  Even though I love working with Linux, as pointed out in a previous blog, I use whatever tools are available to me.  So if Windows works it gets used.  The same goes for Macs and Linux too.  For small businesses though Linux has a lot to offer such as:

1. File sharing and backups

Linux file servers have less hardware requirements than their Windows counterparts meaning less outlay for the client.  For instance you can set up a Linux file server on a computer with only 512Mb RAM.  Try that with a Windows machine!!  The software is also free so you don’t have to pay hundreds of pounds for licences either.

Linux file servers also require less maintenance.  There is no antivirus software to monitor and less hassle with updates.  You can basically install one and it will quite happily sip electric in the corner of the office with the minimum of maintenance for a very long time.

2. Linux Desktops

Now I would place a wager that most people reading this blog use a Windows system at work.  Now there is nothing wrong with that at all but what happens when you have to upgrade your machine.  Should you go for another Windows machine (Windows 8 maybe?) or can I temp you with another option – Ubuntu.  Now there are literally hundreds of Linux desktop versions but I would suggest new users coming from a Windows environment could do a hell of a lot worse than trying Ubuntu.  It is very easy to use and while yes there is a learning curve it is no worse than going from either Windows XP or 7 to Windows 8.  With all Linux systems you also get the knowledge you will never get a virus too.

ubuntu_desktop

 

This is what your new desktop could look like with Ubuntu.  Not so scary hey?

 

 

 

 

 

3. You are probably already using it

There is a good chance that if you own a smartphone you are already using Linux and that is because of Android.  I bet you didn’t know that?

So to sum up depending on what your business requirements are – Windows, Linux or Mac might be better suited to what you need.  Don’t count out Linux because it is “cheap and chearful” because setup correctly it can be a very powerful tool to help your business run smoothly.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

 

 

Linux, Windows or Mac – I don’t really care


I went to a Linux User Group (LUG) last night to meet up with some fellow ‘techies’ and have a natter (I always leave feeling thick!!).  Most of the guys who go only use Linux but some like myself are exposed to both Linux, Windows, and in some cases Mac, in our daily lives.  If I had said I thought Windows was superior in any way to Linux I would have got shot down immediately.  It is not only Linux users who are like this (not all mind you).  I have had numerous ‘discussions’ with fellow IT ‘techs’ who say that they will never use Linux in any way due to it ‘being shit’ and it is only for ‘techies’.  Windows all the way for these guys.

Now I would never say that one operating system is definitely superior to the others but instead I would say that it depends on the situation.  For example if you need a file server for your office then take a look at Linux (in my case either Ubuntu or Debian).  For sharing printers I would say go with Windows (due to availability of print drivers) and if you want graphics then go and get a Mac (I can see the appeal of a Mac but they are overpriced for me).  I could go on and on citing examples but I think you get the point.  However I seem to be in the minority.

Being an IT Engineer when faced with a problem I will use all the available tools at my disposal to fix it.  For example I use Linux Live CD’s to recover data from broken Windows installations while I always carry around (now) a wireless adapter that works on both Linux and Windows systems.  I even have a password cracker (Ophcrack – Linux based) which is very handy when Windows users have forgotten their passwords (non domain)

For me to limit myself to one OS would be foolish as I would be cutting myself off from tools I could use to help my customers.  Windows, Linux or Mac based I don’t really care as long as it does what I need it to do!!

So what do you think? Are you are purist or someone who likes to dabble in the dark side?

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

 

How to set up RAID 1 on an existing Linux system


Recently I did a tutorial on how to set up RAID 1 on a new Linux system.  Today I will show you how to set up RAID 1 on an existing system.  Why I hear you ask on an existing system? It is true that, if possible, you should set up RAID on a server during installation however there are times that you can’t (only one hard disk present or the person installing didn’t know the correct procedure so chose not too instead).

The method I am going to show you involves using a piece of software called Clonezilla, which is opensource cloning software, so you will need to get your hands on it. You can download it from the Clonezilla website.

For the purpose of this tutorial I will be using Ubuntu 12.04 installed on a 500 Gb hard drive.  I will clone the installation using Clonezilla and then set up a RAID 1 array on two new 1 Tb hard drives.  Once the RAID 1 array has been set up I will then copy the Ubuntu image onto it.

Lets get started.  First thing to do is to BACKUP ALL YOUR DATA.  Even though you are effectively backing up your data when you image it I always recommend you backup your data using a different method just incase something happens.

Now onto imaging your system.  I have already written a tutorial which covers the required steps so rather than repeat myself please refer to the Clonezilla Tutorial for the method.

Once you have imaged your system connect your two new 1 Tb hard drives and disconnect the old 500 Gb one and again reboot the system using the Clonezilla Live CD.  Go through the menus the same as before until you get to the screenshot below.

Clonezilla1

 

This time instead of choosing Start_Clonezilla choose Enter_Shell.  Once at the shell we need to check our two new disks so type:

sudo fdisk -l

Write down the designations of the two disks (e.g /dev/sda) as we are going to need these later.

Now we need to create partitions and filesystems on the two disks and we do this by using fdisk.  The steps required to accomplish this are covered in How to format a hard drive on Ubuntu 12.04 using fdisk.

Now we need to install a package called mdadm which we shall use to set up the RAID 1 array so type:

sudo apt-get install mdadm

Once installed we can go about setting up the array.  In your terminal type the following:

sudo mdadm –create –verbose /dev/md0 –level=1 –raid-devices=2 /dev/sda /dev/sdb

NOTE: There are two dashes infront of create, verbose, level and raid

In the above command:

level=1 is the raid level (in this case Mirror)

raid-devices=2 is the number of hard disks in the array

/dev/sda and /dev/sdb are the disks to be used (obtained earlier using fdisk)

If successful then you should get mdadm: array /dev/md0 started

Now we just to check the array so in your terminal type:

mdadm –detail –scan (again using two dashes)

This command should return details of the array we have just set up.

All that is left to do is to exit the shell and resume Clonezilla so in your terminal type:

exit

which should return you to the screenshot we had earlier.  This time choose Start_Clonezilla.

Follow the wizard to install your saved image onto the new RAID 1 array.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

 

 

 

 

My little eeepc 701 lives!!

It lives!! About a month ago my trusty Asus Eee pc701 developed the ‘click of death’ – bugger.  Initially I thought the hard drive was the soldered SSD type which would have meant game over (new motherboard required) but after checking I realised it wasn’t.


Next stop was ebay and I managed to find a new SSD hard drive (16 Gb) for the lovely some of £25 – not to bad.  It arrived the next day and after much rejoicing was fitted.  Now what software to run on it? Initially it had a mighty 8Gb SSD so Windows XP fitted but Windows 7 was a struggle.  Turning to Linux I settled on Lubuntu and it ran smoothly until the hard drive started to fail.  This time around I wanted to see how it would cope with Windows 7 installed so I installed Home Premium first.  With only a 900 Mhz processor under the hood the eepc 701 was never going to be a speed freak but it does run Windows 7 smoothly enough (it is upgraded to 2 Gb RAM) but it is restricted to a resolution of 640 * 480 which is not great.  Due to this limitation I turned back to Linux and currently run it on Linux Mint 13 with the XFCE desktop.  It runs quickly enough for the tasks I need to use it for.

Now why would I go through all this hassle for a netbook which is now 5 years old? A couple of reasons:

1. I hate throwing out old kit.  If I can reuse a piece of computer equipment I will.  The Eeepc 701 still has life in her yet!!

2. Configuring routers and troubleshooting wifi issues.  This is the mainstay for the eeepc 701.  It is great for configuring routers on existing networks and troubleshooting wifi issues. As much as I love my Blackberry Playbook this is one area the netbook trumps it.

3. Sometimes I just want to type.  Surfing the internet on a tablet is great but sometimes I just want to type instead of using a touchscreen keypad.  Yes my Blackberry Playbook has a bluetooth keyboard which is great but it is not the same is it?

4. It is very portable, light and has very good battery life.

Now I could use a laptop but since I don’t own one I would have to go out and spend hundreds of pounds to get one.  The eeepc 701 cost me £25.  No contest is it?

Do you own one of these wonderful little machines?

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

Linux and wireless drivers


I apologise for the rant but this is becoming a pet hate of mine.  It all started last night when I was out at a clients home sorting out some ‘issues’ they had.  One of the items that came up was a Dell Latitude 131L which was running extremely slow on Windows XP.  After some investigation work it was apparent that the system really needed to be reset so after checking what the system was used for (some word documents and internet) I suggested that the client try out Linux.  They agreed.

I choose Lubuntu 12.04 as it runs very fast on older hardware.  The install went smoothly enough and before I knew it the software was installed.  There was one problem though – the wireless card was not recognised.  After checking the type of card, it was a Broadcom, I went hunting on the internet to find the driver.  I found the driver in question and set about trying to install it.  I had to unpack the file, after first installing all the required tools for the job, and then make the file.  Do you think it would play – would it hell!!  After numerous attempts it still would not work so I decided to change distributions and went with Linux Mint 12 instead.  Linux Mint is known as one of the best distributions in regards to drivers but still I could not get the wireless card to work.  In the end I resorted to reinstalling Windows XP.

I have the same issues with my antivirus software.  I use either BitDefender or Kaspersky rescue disks to remove viruses from clients computers.  As these are both Linux based I can’t connect them to wireless networks but have to resort to using a cable to connect instead. This is not usually a problem unless you are on a desktop which is in one room connected wirelessly to the router in the next.

This is the 21st century where everything is moving online into the cloud.  People are becoming more mobile everyday but I still have issues getting wireless cards to work on Linux.  This really needs to get addressed or forget using ‘Desktop Linux’ in the future.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more

 

 

 

 

Amazon Web Services (AWS)

I have a problem.  Regular readers of this blog will know that I use Oracle Virtualbox for all my virtualization needs.  It has all the features I require and is very easy to set up and administer.  There is however one slight issue that has reared its head recently with the release of Windows Server 2012 and that is Hyper V.  Hyper V is so intergrated within Windows Server 2012 that it would be stupid not to use it for virtualization in this kind of environment.  And herein lies the problem – I have never used Hyper V and I have no hardware at the moment to run it on.  In short I would have to spend hundreds of pounds purchasing new hardware inorder to learn it and that is not an option at the moment.


Enter stage left Amazon Web Services (AWS).  I have used this service in the past as part of a job interview (5 interviews and still didn’t get the job!!).  I decided to have a second look yesterday to see if I could use an online server to install Hyper V and learn it that way.  For readers who have never used AWS it is an online service from Amazon which allows you to ‘rent’ server space in the cloud.  You only pay for the time that you use rather than a set fee.  This means that if you require extra capacity on your network for a short period you could use AWS rather than invest in new hardware.  Their pricing is not bad either.

There are so many products that are offered it can get a bit confusing.  The one I chose is EC2  (Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud) which allows me to use the AWS Free Tier.  As a new user you can sign up to AWS Free Tier and get 750 hours FREE each month for a year (and then standard pricing after that) using the t1.micro instances.  An instance is basically a virtual server and Amazon has some predefined ready for you to use.  In the t1 bracket you can choose from a selection of Linux servers (RedHat, SUSE, Ubuntu etc), Windows based (Server 2012 or 2008 R2) or even Amazon based.

I have chosen both Windows Server 2012 and 2008 R2 (along with Ubuntu in the past) which you connect to using Remote Desktop (Windows) or SSH (Linux) using a key pair. Whatever you do don’t lose the key pair as you will not be able to use the server if you do (trust me I have done this in the past!!).

I still haven’t figured out how you connect further computers to the servers yet or even set static ip addresses (DO NOT CHANGE THE AMAZON ONES OR YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO CONNECT AGAIN) but will figure these out in due course and provide you with details.  As a tool to test out new software (fancy learning Windows Server 2012 anyone?) AWS surely can’t be beaten.

And Hyper V? It turns out that Amazon Web Services use the Xen Hypervisor so I can’t install Hyper V anyway.  Bugger!! Never mind I still get to learn new software along the way.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

How open source software is helping to run my business


Today I will show you the virtues of opensource software and how I am using it to run my business.

So what is Opensource software?

Opensource software is software that is written by developers (either individuals or companies) and then distributed freely to anyone who wants it (i.e no license fees).  You are then able to modify the software to your hearts content so that it does exactly what you want.  The developers get paid by providing support to companies that want it.

So what software do I use?

My main server

The bulk of the processing power behind ComTech is my main server running Ubuntu Server 12.04 with 8Gb of RAM.  Ubuntu is a Linux distribution (think Windows but free) that is easy to use and has virtually no virus problems (very handy that).  It is also very versatile in that it can be fine tuned to provide any service you want without having to pay extra license fees.

Desktops

I run various desktops but not in the traditional sense.  I run them as virtual machines using Oracle Virtualbox.  Virtualbox allows me to run multiple operating systems at the same time on the same machine.  For example I do the bulk of my work on a Linux Mint 13 desktop (another Linux distribution which is very easy to use) but I also have Windows 7, Windows XP and Windows Vista virtual desktops ready to be fired up when the need arises.  If I need to test a piece of software on Windows 7 I would fire up the Windows 7 virtual machine, test the software and then shut it back down again.  All of this is done on one machine which in this case is my main server.  Virtualbox is a very handy piece of software and guess what it is also free!!

Word Processing (productivity in general)

I use a piece of software called Libreoffice (think Microsoft Office but without the license fee).  It looks and feels (for the most part) like you are using Office and is fully compatible with Office so any document you create in Libreoffice can be opened up and edited in Office itself.

Printing

I have an Edimax MFN print server set up which allows my HP Deskjet F380 printer (old but still going strong) to be shared across the network to any system without the need to be attached to a computer (attaches to the router instead).  It works flawlessly with my Linux operating systems but still has issues with Windows 7 (which I haven’t ironed out yet!!).

Netbook 

I have an Asus Eeepc 701 SD netbook which I bought back in 2008 to use when solving IT issues at clients premises.  The specs on the netbook aren’t great however it runs Lubuntu 12.04 (another Linux distribution – see a pattern?) and has bombproof build quality (it has been dropped multiple times and is kid proof!!).  It is perfect for configuring routers, checking wireless connectivity or browsing the internet.  I am even writing this blog on it while sitting in a coffee shop in Stirling.

Internet

I don’t like Internet Explorer – fact.  I find it has too many configurable items which if configured incorrectly can really bugger up a system.  Don’t like the interface either so instead I use either Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome.  Now Firefox is fully opensource while Chrome is classed as freeware which is slightly different.  Either way both are superior to Internet Explorer in  my experience.

Backups

I am anal when it comes to backups (it is my job so I have to).  I have an onsite backup server running FreeNAS and also employ online strorage using Dropbox.  FreeNAS is fully opensource and is an operating system specifically designed for backing up data and runs on pretty much any piece of hardware ever made.  I have it running on a Pentium 4 machine with 512 Mb of RAM and it has quite happily been supping electric in the corner for the last two years with no issues.  Dropbox on the other hand is proprietary software where you pay a monthly subscription.  While it is not opensource I have yet to find a product which comes close to it.

Firewall

Every computer needs a firewall and my systems are no different.  I have chosen to go down the Linux Firewall distribution route which basically installs an operating system onto a spare computer and in effect turns it into a hardware firewall.  My firewall of choice at the moment is Smoothwall Express 3.0 which I run in a virtual machine (don’t have any spare computers lying around).  It is even configured to boot whenever the server restarts thereby not leaving my systems unprotected.  By using a Firewall distribution I can protect my entire network rather than only individual systems.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

How to share files on Ubuntu 12.10 (Desktop)

Today I will show you how to share files on Ubuntu 12.10.  I will be using the desktop version of Ubuntu 12.10 so this tutorial will not work on the server variant (later tutorials will cover that).


The first thing we need to do is to install the packages we need so open up a terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install samba4

Type your root password when prompted.  Then install cifs-utils by typing:

sudo apt-get install cifs-utils

and then type your root password again.

Now that the required software is installed we can configure it so in your terminal type:

sudo gedit /etc/samba/smb.conf

In the configuration file locate the line WORKROUP = WORKGROUP and change it to the name of your network.  So for instance mine would be changed to WORKGROUP = Home_Network1.

Save the file and exit.

It is now time to add users who will be able to access the shared files and we do this by using the smbpasswd file.  Only users specified in the smbpasswd file will be able to access your samba shares and only users who have users accounts on the system can be added.  In your terminal type:

sudo smbpasswd -a user (where user is the name of the person allowed to access the shares)

When prompted enter their new password twice.  If more than one user is allowed to access the share repeat the process.

Now we need to share some files so click Dashboard (top left) and type Samba to open up the file sharing GUI.

 

Click on the Add sign to get the following screen.

Choose which directory you would like to share and give it a share name.  Make sure that you tick both Writable and Visible (shown above).

On the Access tab you can choose which users are able to access the shares.  Click on the user (or users) you added to smbpasswd earlier.

After you do configuration changes in samba you have to restart the service so in a terminal type:

sudo service samba4 restart

Now we have to check the all the configuration files so in your terminal type:

testparm

Testparm will tell you if there are any errors in your configuration.  If everything is Ok then type:

smbclient -L 10.0.0.151 (where 10.0.0.151 is the ip address of your samba server).

This will show you the list of all your available samba shares.  At this point if you have no errors your server is configured correctly.

How to connect to your shared files 

On Linux Clients:

Install samba and cifs-utils either using the package manager or the terminal.  We need to edit the Workgroup field in smb.conf to the name of your network (e.g Home_Network1).

Then we have to mount the available shares.  First decide where you are going to mount them.  I will mount them in /media/dev/share but first I will have to make the directory dev so:

cd /media

sudo mkdir dev

and then ls which should show us the new dev directory in media. To mount the shares at boot you will need to add the following line to /etc/fstab

//10.0.0.155/(share)   /media/dev/share      cifs       username=user,password=pass,user,rw,noatime     0              0

On Windows Clients:

We have to change the workgroup to Home_Network1 and then add the ip address of the samba server to the hosts file (must open as administrator).

Once this is complete map the shares to your computer.

Word of warning here about firewalls.  Either turn them off or add exception rules for traffic on ports 137-139 and 445.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are the factors affecting mainstream adoption of Linux?


I love Linux.  My business systems are based on it and I try to ‘spread the good word’ whenever possible.  If you speak to the general public though about Linux you usually get the blank looks of ‘whats that?’ The general public doesn’t know about Linux or doesn’t want to know.  This has got me thinking – what are the factors affecting mainstream adoption of Linux?

1. Microsoft Windows

Love it or hate it Windows is the standard when it comes to the desktop.  Users are used to it and don’t want to try anything else.  Those that do want an experience which replicates the one they used to get on their Windows machines.

2. Hardware Support

This is one of the major bugbears with a lot of users (especially new users).  Their printers, wireless adapters etc just worked on Windows but when they switched across to Linux they didn’t.  They have to spend hours scouring forums and the internet in general to find a solution.  Hardware support is generally getting better but there is still a long way to go.

3. The ‘Techie’ Image

There is still an image that Linux is only being used by geeks.  The general public think you must use the command line for everything and that Linux is not user friendly.  Yes it is true you can use the command line if you wish but there are now distributions like Ubuntu or Mint where a user doesn’t have to go near a terminal if they don’t wish to.

4. Elitist Attitude

I have lost count of the number of times I have been on forums where a new user has asked for help with a specific problem and someone has posted back RTFM.  Very helpful hey? Lose the chip people or Linux is never going to become mainstream.  Everyone was a newbie once.

5. Marketing

Microsoft and Apple spend billions on marketing.  Linux?  As far as I know very little is spent on raising the profile.

6. There is little backing from the major hardware manufacturers

Not many of the major manufacturers install Linux by default on their systems.  Nearly all install Windows so there is little incentive for hardware vendors to write Linux software for their devices.

7. There is no standard way to install software on Linux

Windows has its .exe file format.  What do we have on Linux? Well it depends on what distribution you are using!!  You can get deb files for Ubuntu or Debian or rpm files on Fedora, CentOS etc.  What Linux needs is a standardized file format so that software written for one distribution can also be installed on all the major distributions without having to tweak it.

8.There are too many distros

There are too many distributions on the market.  Yes I know that people like choice but you can’t expect hardware manufacturers to write software for all of them as this is not possible.  A new user to Linux is faced with literally hundreds of choices and this can be very daunting.  The community needs to pool resources and get behind one or maybe two distributions.  If this happened then there would be a lot more resources to take on Microsoft and Apple head on and raise the profile of Linux.  At the moment there are a lot of little voices in the wind instead of one big voice.

Do you agree or disagree with my reasons?  Let the battle commence!!

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

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