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Is Ubuntu bashing now an acceptable standard for Linux?

One of Linux’s finest virtues is freedom.  Freedom to do what you want with a piece of code so long as you make your new code available to anyone who uses it.  Sounds fair doesn’t it? So why is it then that when Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, try to do something different they get hammered for it?


I was reading a blog post last week (sorry I have lost the link) about Ubuntu’s choice to include Mir probably in 14.04 LTS. The author really didn’t like this at all and throughout the blog was making references to Mark Shuttleworths ego, how Ubuntu wasn’t listening to its users and how Linux was a democracy and that the people hadn’t voted for this.  Now since when is Linux a democracy? Linus Torvalds has the final say on what goes into the Linux kernel.  There isn’t a vote to see what everyone wants and to be honest I am thankful for that as you can have too many chiefs making the decisions at the top.

Canonical is a business and businesses have to make money inorder for them to survive.  This is why I can understand the Amazon connection when you search for something in Dash.  I may not like it but I can understand it.  Their push into the tablet territory is also understandable as this is where the market is going if people want to believe it or not.  There is one BIG BUT in all of this and that is I can choose not to use Ubuntu if I don’t like the direction Canonical are taking it.  There are literally hundreds of distributions to choose from so if you don’t like the direction one is heading then you just choose another.  It is that simple.  There is no need to constantly bash Canonical (and by default Ubuntu) because you don’t like what it is doing.

Personally I choose Debian for my servers and Mint for my desktops.  I have tried Ubuntu a couple of times and personally find it less stable than Debian and less attractive than Mint. But guess what I didn’t cry foul from the rooftops just because I didnt like it.  I just chose something else and that is what a lot of people are needing to do.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in Stirling and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

The PC in your pocket


Now I already know that that the newest smartphones on the market are pretty powerful and can do almost everything that a user would need however there are times when a full desktop or laptop fits the bill rather better. Trying to type a document on a smartphone can be rather tedious when compared to a laptop with its full office suite (whether it be Microsoft office, Libreoffice or something else).

Now with processing power and memory increasing every year on smartphones I think we have reached the point where they are approaching the processing power of laptops 5 years ago and this got me thinking.  Is there a way to to have the best of both worlds?  What I mean is a desktop when you need to ‘get things done’  and a phone when out and about.  To this end I scoured the internet to see if such a thing was on the cards and found the Ubuntu Phone.

ubuntu-touch-preview-431x269

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone who knows anything about Ubuntu knows that they make a really good opensource operating system for desktops and laptops.  Recently they have decided to have a crack at the phone and tablet market with Ubuntu touch and the initial progress looks very promising. Basically what they are trying to do is have a Ubuntu smartphone when out and about but when the phone is plugged into a docking station, and a keyboard and monitor added, you get a full desktop version of Ubuntu full of all your favourite productivity tools – Libreoffice, GIMP and so forth.  Sounds good hey?

They are aiming for the phones to be out towards the end of 2013 and good luck to them.  If they can pull this off then the market could be turned on its head overnight.  Surely this is the way forward where we just have one powerful device which when docked (in an office, at home etc) expands its abilities and allows us to be productive rather than one device for this and one device for that.

Me I am waiting patiently to see how this pans out but the Ubuntu Phone is a very tempting prospect.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in Stirling, Falkirk and Clackmannanshire.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more!!

 

 

Using Linux in a small business – cheap and chearful IT?


I have had quite a lot of Linux work recently which makes a nice change.  When out at a clients premises earlier this week I got chatting to one of the employees who out of curiosity asked what it was I was actually doing with the server. To this I replied “installing Linux to act as a file server to share and backup all your data”.  The response I got was “hey I thought Linux was dead – proper old school only for businesses or people who don’t have a lot of money”

I had the same response when talking to another “techie” person this week.  He described it as “cheap and chearful IT” and “businesses only like it because it is cheap”.  As you can imagine I totally disagreed with this.  Even though I love working with Linux, as pointed out in a previous blog, I use whatever tools are available to me.  So if Windows works it gets used.  The same goes for Macs and Linux too.  For small businesses though Linux has a lot to offer such as:

1. File sharing and backups

Linux file servers have less hardware requirements than their Windows counterparts meaning less outlay for the client.  For instance you can set up a Linux file server on a computer with only 512Mb RAM.  Try that with a Windows machine!!  The software is also free so you don’t have to pay hundreds of pounds for licences either.

Linux file servers also require less maintenance.  There is no antivirus software to monitor and less hassle with updates.  You can basically install one and it will quite happily sip electric in the corner of the office with the minimum of maintenance for a very long time.

2. Linux Desktops

Now I would place a wager that most people reading this blog use a Windows system at work.  Now there is nothing wrong with that at all but what happens when you have to upgrade your machine.  Should you go for another Windows machine (Windows 8 maybe?) or can I temp you with another option – Ubuntu.  Now there are literally hundreds of Linux desktop versions but I would suggest new users coming from a Windows environment could do a hell of a lot worse than trying Ubuntu.  It is very easy to use and while yes there is a learning curve it is no worse than going from either Windows XP or 7 to Windows 8.  With all Linux systems you also get the knowledge you will never get a virus too.

ubuntu_desktop

 

This is what your new desktop could look like with Ubuntu.  Not so scary hey?

 

 

 

 

 

3. You are probably already using it

There is a good chance that if you own a smartphone you are already using Linux and that is because of Android.  I bet you didn’t know that?

So to sum up depending on what your business requirements are – Windows, Linux or Mac might be better suited to what you need.  Don’t count out Linux because it is “cheap and chearful” because setup correctly it can be a very powerful tool to help your business run smoothly.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

 

 

How to set up a print server on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS using Samba


Today I will show you how to set up a print server on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS using Samba. Samba is really good for sharing files and folders but it can also be used to share printers very easily too.  This tutorial will work on both the desktop and server variants.

First thing is to install the packages we need – Samba and smbfs. So open up a terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install samba

Type your root password when prompted.  Then install smbfs by typing:

sudo apt-get install smbfs

and then type your root password again.

We now have to configure the smb.conf file which contains all the samba settings. In a terminal type:

sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

Locate the line WORKROUP = WORKGROUP and change it to the name of your network.  So for instance mine would be changed to WORKGROUP = Ubuntu_home.

Save the file and exit.

We now need to restart the samba service so in a terminal type:

sudo service smbd restart

Now we have to check the configuration so far.  In a terminal type:

testparm

If everything is configured correctly then you shouldn’t receive any error messages and your server is ready to go.

Linux Clients

Install samba and smbfs either using the package manager or the terminal.  We need to edit the Workgroup field in smb.conf to the name of your network (e.g Ubuntu_home). Restart the samba service and install your printer.

Windows Clients

We have to change the workgroup to Ubuntu_home and then add your printer.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows and Linux based IT Support, laptop repairs and computer repairs to both business and personal clients in and around Stirling.

For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find a list of my services, testimonials, blog and much more.

How to configure file sharing on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS


Today I will show you how to configure file sharing on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.  This tutorial works for both the desktop and server variations.

First thing is to install the packages we need – Samba and smbfs. So open up a terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install samba

Type your root password when prompted.  Then install smbfs by typing:

sudo apt-get install smbfs

and then type your root password again.

We now have to configure the smb.conf file which contains all the samba settings. In a terminal type:

gksu nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

Locate the line WORKROUP = WORKGROUP and change it to the name of your network.  So for instance mine would be changed to WORKGROUP = Ubuntu_home.

Now at the end of the file add the following text:

[sdc] (This is the name of your share – change as appropriate)
path = /media/dev/sdc (This is the network path to your share – change as appropriate)
available = yes
browsable = yes
public = yes
writable = yes
comment = shared files

Save the file and exit.

If you prefer GUI’s (Desktop Ubuntu only) then you can install the Samba gui instead and share your folders that way.

Now we have to add users to the smbpasswd file which is located at /etc/samba/smbpasswd.  Only users specified in the smbpasswd file will be able to access your samba shares.  Open a terminal and type:

sudo smbpasswd -a user (where user is the name of the person allowed to access the shares)

When prompted enter their new password twice.

We now need to restart the samba service so in a terminal type:

sudo service smbd restart

Now we have to check the configuration so far.  In a terminal type:

testparm

Testparm will tell you if there are any errors in your configuration.  If everything is Ok then type:

smbclient -L 192.168.1.10 (where 192.168.1.10 is the ip address of your samba server).

This will show you the list of all your available samba shares.  At this point if you have no errors your server is configured correctly.

Linux Clients

Install samba and smbfs either using the package manager or the terminal.  We need to edit the Workgroup field in smb.conf to the name of your network (e.g Ubuntu_home).

Then we have to mount the available shares.  First decide where you are going to mount them.  I will mount them in /media/dev/share but first I will have to make the directory dev so:

cd /media

sudo mkdir dev

and then ls which should show us the new dev directory in media.  Now time to mount the shares.

sudo mount -t smbfs //192.168.1.10/(share name) /media/dev/share where 192.168.1.10 is the ip address of your samba server.  This will mount the share but only as long as you are logged in.  To make the link persistent you need to enter the following line into /etc/fstab.

//192.168.1.10/(share)   /media/dev/share      cifs       username=user,password=pass,user,rw,noatime     0              0

Windows Clients

We have to change the workgroup to Ubuntu_home and then add the ip address of the samba server to the hosts file (must open as administrator).

Once this is complete map the shares to your computer.

Word of warning here about firewalls.  Either turn them off or add exception rules for traffic on ports 137-139 and 445.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

How to set up a dhcp server on Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS


Today I will show you how to install and configure a dhcp server on Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS.

The first thing we need to do is install the packages we need.  Open up a terminal and type:

sudo apt-get install isc-dhcp-server

There are two main files /etc/default/isc-dhcp-server and /etc/dhcp/dhcpd.conf which we will need to configure so lets take the first.  Open up a terminal and using your favourite text editor type:

sudo nano /etc/default/isc-dhcp-server

You should get the following:

———————————————————————————————–

# Defaults for dhcp initscript
# sourced by /etc/init.d/dhcp
# installed at /etc/default/isc-dhcp-server by the maintainer scripts

#
# This is a POSIX shell fragment
#

# On what interfaces should the DHCP server (dhcpd) serve DHCP requests?
# Separate multiple interfaces with spaces, e.g. “eth0 eth1?.
INTERFACES=”eth0″

————————————————————————————————–

Replace eth0 above with the name of your network interface that you want the server to lease addresses on.

Onto the next file. Open up a terminal and type:

sudo nano /etc/dhcp/dhcpd.conf

which should give you the output below.

————————————————————————————————-

#
# Sample configuration file for ISC dhcpd for Debian
#
# Attention: If /etc/ltsp/dhcpd.conf exists, that will be used as
# configuration file instead of this file.
#
#

# The ddns-updates-style parameter controls whether or not the server will
# attempt to do a DNS update when a lease is confirmed. We default to the
# behavior of the version 2 packages (‘none’, since DHCP v2 didn’t
# have support for DDNS.)
ddns-update-style none;

# option definitions common to all supported networks…
option domain-name “example.org”;
option domain-name-servers ns1.example.org, ns2.example.org;

option domain-name “comtech.com”;
default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;

# If this DHCP server is the official DHCP server for the local
# network, the authoritative directive should be uncommented.
#authoritative;

# Use this to send dhcp log messages to a different log file (you also
# have to hack syslog.conf to complete the redirection).
log-facility local7;

# No service will be given on this subnet, but declaring it helps the
# DHCP server to understand the network topology.

#subnet 10.152.187.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
#}

# This is a very basic subnet declaration.

subnet 10.0.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 10.0.0.150 10.0.0.253;
option routers 10.0.0.2;
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;

option broadcast-address 10.0.0.254;
option domain-name-servers 10.0.0.1, 10.0.0.2;

option ntp-servers 10.0.0.1;
option netbios-name-servers 10.0.0.1;
option netbios-node-type 8;
}

# option routers rtr-239-0-1.example.org, rtr-239-0-2.example.org;

#}

# This declaration allows BOOTP clients to get dynamic addresses,
# which we don’t really recommend.

#subnet 10.254.239.32 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
# range dynamic-bootp 10.254.239.40 10.254.239.60;
# option broadcast-address 10.254.239.31;
# option routers rtr-239-32-1.example.org;
#}

# A slightly different configuration for an internal subnet.
#subnet 10.5.5.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
# range 10.5.5.26 10.5.5.30;
# option domain-name-servers ns1.internal.example.org;
# option domain-name “internal.example.org”;
# option routers 10.5.5.1;
# option broadcast-address 10.5.5.31;
# default-lease-time 600;
# max-lease-time 7200;
#}

# Hosts which require special configuration options can be listed in
# host statements. If no address is specified, the address will be
# allocated dynamically (if possible), but the host-specific information
# will still come from the host declaration.

#host passacaglia {
# hardware ethernet 0:0:c0:5d:bd:95;
# filename “vmunix.passacaglia”;
# server-name “toccata.fugue.com”;
#}

# Fixed IP addresses can also be specified for hosts. These addresses
# should not also be listed as being available for dynamic assignment.
# Hosts for which fixed IP addresses have been specified can boot using
# BOOTP or DHCP. Hosts for which no fixed address is specified can only
# be booted with DHCP, unless there is an address range on the subnet
# to which a BOOTP client is connected which has the dynamic-bootp flag
# set.
#host fantasia {
# hardware ethernet 08:00:07:26:c0:a5;
# fixed-address fantasia.fugue.com;
#}

# You can declare a class of clients and then do address allocation
# based on that. The example below shows a case where all clients
# in a certain class get addresses on the 10.17.224/24 subnet, and all
# other clients get addresses on the 10.0.29/24 subnet.

#class “foo” {
# match if substring (option vendor-class-identifier, 0, 4) = “SUNW”;
#}

#shared-network 224-29 {
# subnet 10.17.224.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
# option routers rtr-224.example.org;
# }
# subnet 10.0.29.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
# option routers rtr-29.example.org;
# }
# pool {
# allow members of “foo”;
# range 10.17.224.10 10.17.224.250;
# }
# pool {
# deny members of “foo”;
# range 10.0.29.10 10.0.29.230;
# }
#}

————————————————————————————————

This needs a little bit of explaining.

1. Everything in bold needs adding to the file.  Adjust your settings according to your network requirements.

2. The option domain name is your dns zone name.  For example mine is set to comtech.com.

3. Range should be the range of ip addresses that you want the server to give out to clients.

Now restart the dhcp service by typing:

sudo service isc-dhcp-server restart

Thats it!! Your dhcp server should be running, however it is best to check.  Open up a terminal and type:

sudo netstat -uap

which will show you the following information:

————————————————————————————————

Active Internet connections (servers and established)

Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State PID/Program name

udp 0 0 *:55827 *:* 916/avahi-daemon: r
udp 0 0 chris-desktop.lo:domain *:* 1273/named
udp 0 0 chris-desktop:domain *:* 1273/named
udp 0 0 *:bootps *:* 4525/dhcpd
udp 0 0 *:17500 *:* 1768/dropbox
udp 0 0 *:54407 *:* 4539/VirtualBox
udp 0 0 10.0.0.255:netbios-ns *:* 1016/nmbd
udp 0 0 chris-deskto:netbios-ns *:* 1016/nmbd
udp 0 0 *:netbios-ns *:* 1016/nmbd
udp 0 0 10.0.0.255:netbios-dgm *:* 1016/nmbd
udp 0 0 chris-deskt:netbios-dgm *:* 1016/nmbd
udp 0 0 *:netbios-dgm *:* 1016/nmbd
udp 0 0 *:mdns *:* 916/avahi-daemon: r
udp6 0 0 [::]:domain [::]:* 1273/named
udp6 0 0 [::]:51853 [::]:* 916/avahi-daemon: r
udp6 0 0 [::]:mdns [::]:* 916/avahi-daemon: r

————————————————————————————————

This shows that the dhcp daemon is working

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

 

The problem with Linux


Before I get blasted for writing this I would like to say that I love Linux.  My business is built on Linux and open source software and it generally fills most if not all my computing requirements.  Then how, I hear you cry, can I write a blog which starts “The Problem with Linux”? Simple, the user experience, and I shall explain more.

This morning I got a message on Facebook from a client I had seen last night.  The issue was that I had installed vlc on a netbook with Linux Mint 11 which did not allow them to record audio from a webcam.  Turns out that vlc and webcams don’t really get on (another thing learnt then!!).  No problem I will just do some research and find a better program but this is where the problem started.  Most of the packages available were from source.  Now I have no problem with downloading and installing from source but your average user will.  Why can’t we have deb and rpm downloads (which most distributions use) so that users can just go and install the package they want.  Yes we have package managers but not all the software your average user wants is already in there.  Yes I can charge money for installing software for my clients but it really isn’t the best is it?

Next thing is choice.  Personally I think there is too much choice.  For example, how many distributions based on Ubuntu or Debian do we really need?  Again your average user just wants a system that works and they definitely don’t want to have to choose packages.  Most people for example will use Microsoft Word for word processing but you give them a Linux system and suddenly they can have Libreoffice, Openoffice, Abiword etc and they become overwhelmed with the amount of choice.  They have come from a Windows system where you are told Windows Media Player does video, Internet Explorer IS the internet etc so they have become molded into this way of thinking.

Next thing is support.  I am a Linux Mint user and I must say that the community forum is brillant.  Having browsed around some of the other forums I can honestly say that there are some people who take the attitude that if you don’t have the same amount of Linux knowledge as them then you must be stupid.  The amount of times I have come across postings from people who think it is ok to post “read the f****** manual” is incredible.  How on earth is this helpful to someone who is making the switch from a Windows system?  All it does is enforce peoples opinion of “us and them” and that is not going to help anyone.

The command line.  Those three words terrify your average user.  The command line is great if you need to work with a server (no gui) but does the average user really need to go anywhere near it to do simple tasks?  I am not saying take it away by any means but lets not forget that although some of us love to tinker and improve our systems by using the command line most users see a computer as a vessel to get things done.  They don’t want to learn how it works they just want to use it.

Why does Linux try and reinvent the wheel?  We have software that does pretty much everything we could ever want so why do we need another KDE or Gnome distribution based on Ubuntu, Debian, Slackware etc?  We now have Openoffice and Libreoffice where surely it would be more beneficial if all the developers got involved in the same project and took on Microsoft Office?

Why do we need new distribution updates every 6 months? If you told your average Windows user they would have to save all their documents and install another operating system every 18 months (usual life span of the major distributions) they would up and leave.  Yes I understand the need to keep packages upto date and have the newest stuff but to me this is just to quick.  For instance the world has had Windows XP for 11 years while Linux Mint 12, which is used to run most of my business, will be gone in about 18 months.

Linux will not become more adopted, outside servers, unless the experience for the average user becomes simpler.  Recent estimates of desktop adoption put Linux at 1.5% well behind both Microsoft and Apple.  To get Linux adopted more we have to start designing for both the average user and the power user.

About the Author

P1020114

Hi I’m Chris Wakefield the owner of ComTech IT Support. I provide Windows, Mac and Linux based IT Support to small businesses in Stirling, Alloa and Falkirk.

Follow @Comtech247 on Twitter

 

Ubuntu vs Linux


Apologises for the title but some people are of the opinion that because Ubuntu is the most well known linux distribution on the market then they must be slammed for stealing all the limelight.

I was browsing the net yesterday when I came across an article on www.linuxtoday.com which caught my eye.  It was about Ubuntu and its users getting ridiculed for basically using Ubuntu and I thought here we go again.  You see us Linux users can be a fickle bunch.  If someone is seen as not using Linux in the same way that we do then they are wrong by default.  What a load of rubbish and below I shall explain why.

The basis of the Ubuntu bashing can be shortened down to:

1. People think Ubuntu is Linux

2. Ubuntu does not do enough to support the linux kernel or gnome

3. You very rarely have to to use the command line in Ubuntu

So lets take these one at a time.  First off Ubuntu has put a lot of effort and money into marketing Linux and has raised the publics perception of Linux as a result.  Some people might think Linux is Ubuntu but you can’t blame the distribution or its users for that.  Without Ubuntu people would still think that Linux is only suitable for super geeks and not for the average Joe.  They should be praised not slammed.

The next point. Ubuntu does not do enough to support the linux kernel or the Gnome desktop.  So what?  All the linux code is published under the GPL and no where does it state that you have to particpate in writing code in the first place.  This is the fundemental principle of open source.  Anyone can use the code as long as they publish their own code at the end.  There are hundreds of Linux Distributions on the market at the moment and I would bet my house that they don’t all share equal responsiblity for maintaining code for the kernel, gnome or any other software for that matter.

On to the command line.  Like I said in my last blog you don’t have to use the command line if you don’t want to.  For everyday stuff you can just use the graphical user interface (GUI) instead.  Can someone please tell me why this is wrong?  I would consider myself and intermediate linux user (CompTIA Linux + qualification) and there are times when I would rather use a GUI than try to remember all the commands for the terminal.  If you want to fully understand Linux then yes you need to learn the command line but the average user will not care.  They just want to word process, browse the net and maybe do some printing.  We need to lose this elitist attitude.  We all use Linux.  It is designed so that users can use it in whatever way they choose. It is this freedom of choice that is the foundation of what using open source is all about.

I don’t use Ubuntu I use Linux Mint 12  instead. Freedom to chose, isn’t it wonderful.

About the Author

Hi I am Chris the owner of ComTech. I provide IT Support, Laptop repairs and Computer repairs to both personal and business clients in and around Stirling. For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find my blog, testimonials, services and much more.  Start supporting a local business today so I can start supporting you.

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The Linux Distribution


When this blog first started we introduced you to Linux. This time we are going to expand that further and introduce the Linux Distribution.

Lets take it one step at a time. Windows comes in different varieties, for example, XP, Vista, 7 and so on. So does Linux, however there are some fundamental differences between the two.

At the time of writing there are literally hundreds of Linux Distributions available from hundreds of different companies all offering their own “flavour” of Linux. Since there is no one company in charge of Linux development distributions can fork off and take their own direction, for example Slackware is aimed at the Linux pro where Smoothwall is a dedicated firewall. Chances are there is a distribution which fits your own personal criteria.

OK so which one is best? Well this depends on your own point of view. Linux pros might like Slackware or Gentoo, intermediates with some knowledge of Linux might like Fedora while total newbees might like Ubuntu or Mint. Your best bet is to take a look at www.distrowatch.com to see a list of all the distributions and pick the one that suits you.

This is where Window phobes will usually perk up and say Linux is rubbish, it has no support, no packages, you have to use the command line all the time and it is not compatible with anything.  Lets use Linux Mint 9 as an example.  Linux Mint 9 comes with the option of 30,000 packages for you to download if you wish. Does sir want a package to play their CD’s on then how about Rhythmbox or a package for pictures then use GIMP. You see there is a package for just about anything you could wish for.

What about support, you can use the online community forums for your distribution for hints and solutions on how to fix any problems that you might have (in the same way you do for windows). The thing is that you will probably have less things go wrong with a linux system than you will with windows.

As for the command line you can use it if you wish but it is not necessary. It is true that to fully understand Linux the command line is essential but if you only want to browse the web, download packages and just do all the usual stuff then you don’t need to go near it.

So lets round up. Linux HAS support, Linux HAS thousands of packages, you DON’T have to use the command line if you don’t want to and IS compatible with all the standards (just save stuff as a doc file for instance).  It is also more stable, free (no licence fee) and you DON’T have to worry about viruses. Go on give it a go!!

About the Author

Hi I am Chris the owner of ComTech. I provide IT Support, laptop repairs and Computer repairs to both personal and business clients in and around Stirling. For a list of what I can offer you why not visit my website www.comtech247.net where you will find my blog, testimonials, services and much more.  Start supporting a local business today so I can start supporting you.

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